Category Archives: Women’s Caucus PDB

Encouraging study – women more involved in 2020 political process

From the Benicia Independent

[Roger Straw on BenIndy: I got this in an email from Susannah Delano of Close the Gap California.  Too much BAD news these days – here’s one to get our hopes up.  Fascinating charts – especially Key Takeaway #1. – R.S.]

Stepping Up and Standing Out: Women’s Political Participation in 2020

Read the memo here, the blog post here, and the press release here

Women of all ages and political affiliations — particularly millennials and women of color—have become more politically engaged since 2016, a trend that is likely to continue in the 2020 cycle. Our new research gives further insights into what motivates women and how they plan to participate this year.

Key Takeaways:

1. The 2016 election marked a new era of women’s involvement in political issues and campaigns and they show no sign of stopping in the 2020 cycle.

  • Only 16% of all surveyed women voters said they have become less politically involved in the last few years, with more than half (55%) saying their involvement has stayed the same, and almost one third (29%) reporting increased involvement.
    • The survey shows that Democratic women have been especially motivated to actively participate in the political process, with 35% saying that they have gotten more involved in politics in the last few years, compared to 27% of Republican women and 23% of women who consider themselves Independent.
    • Increased participation is notable among two key voting blocs: 41% of millennial women (18-34 years old) and 36% of women of color say that they have gotten more involved recently.
  • Looking ahead to the 2020 election, the trend of increased involvement is likely to continue, with 31% of women saying they will become more involved and only 9% saying they will be less engaged.
    • Among Democratic women, 39% say they will be more involved this year along with 40% of millennial woman and 40% of women of color.

2. Women are engaging in a range of activities, but are particularly focused on encouraging friends or family to vote or get involved in a campaign or issue.

  • 42% of respondents said that they have encouraged friends or family members to vote or become involved in a campaign or issue—compared to just 35% of men.
  • Millennial women are leading the charge and taking to the streets— nearly one-fourth of them (23%) reported that they have attended a march, rally, or protest since 2016.
  • On every key political action, women of color report being more politically engaged than white women—they volunteer their time, donate to candidates, attend marches, sign petitions, and encourage their friends to get involved at higher rates.

3. Despite increased involvement in political issues, women voters identified time (i.e. being too busy working and/or taking care of family) as the biggest barrier to getting politically involved.

  • The survey asked voters to choose their top reason for not getting involved among a list of several potential barriers: 22% of women said they were too busy working or taking care of their families as the top reason they didn’t get involved compared to 12% of men who identified work or family obligations as their main barrier.

4. Confidence in their own political knowledge is also a barrier unique to women.

  • Despite comparable news consumption, women are 3 times more likely to choose “I don’t know enough about political issues to get involved” as their top reason for not getting involved in politics (15% of women vs. 5% of men).

5. Women, on either side of the political aisle, are primarily motivated by the aspirations they hold for the country.

  • We tested several reasons for why voters have gotten involved in politics in the past few years, and the top two are I want to make my country a better place and I want to make sure our country moves forward not backward.

6. Women are inspired by other women’s political involvement, especially when it comes to supporting women running for office.

  • Women are more likely to volunteer or donate to female candidates, especially Democratic and millennial women, as well as women of color.


The survey was conducted nationwide among 800 likely 2020 presidential voters (including 600 women and 200 men) during December 5-12, 2019.Full data report available here.

Thurs, May 23 in Benicia – PDB Women’s Caucus – Knock Down the House

Dear Progressive Democrats,

Our Women’s Caucus will be hosting a free screening of the film Knock Down the House (trailer here) on Thursday, May 23rd at 7pm, in the Garden Room at the Casa de Vilarrasa, 383 East I Street, Benicia, and we would love to see you there – women AND men!

Knock Down the House follows the incredible stories of four women who decide to run for office against all odds. At a moment of historic volatility in American politics, these women set themselves on a journey that changed their lives and country forever.

At the screening, we’ll provide a brief introduction, screen the film and facilitate a lively discussion afterward. Feel free to bring a snack or drink to share.

For more details please RSVP here: https://screenings.knockdownthehouse.com/event/watch_attend/4234

We hope to see you there – women AND men – and feel free to invite friends!

Kari Birdseye
m: 415.350.7562

Close the Gap California – new look, quarterly report

April 10, 2019See what Close the Gap California accomplished in the first quarter of 2019: Quarterly Report CTG-CA.

You will recall that Close the Gap California’s Executive Director, Susannah Delano, was part of the panel for PDB’s Women Forum on March 8 organized by our Women’s Caucus.  The quarterly report mentions Benicia, and pictures Susannah along with State Controller Betty Yee at the event with others during the evening.